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Perfectly Persuasion


thistlesandrain:

Starting my own cover for Persuasion. My favorite Jane Austen book has suffered over the years from a lack of interesting covers that have anything to do with the story. I hope mine will honor it. This will take awhile.

brookristy:

Can you watch Jane Austen’s Persuasion too many times?

Didn’t think so.



itsonthesyllabus:

"The only thing I claim for my sex is the privilege of loving longer when hope is gone."

Dammit, Persuasion, stahp!

I’m not crying, you’re crying.

What?




lady-marywarrelman:

Anne Elliot and Frederick Wentworth (1995) Vs Anne Elliot and Frederick Wentworth (2007)


"Who can be in doubt of what followed?"

from Persuasion by Jane Austen (1817)

theoddlifeoflindsay:

I’m laughing a lot




paperbackcastles:

People always seem surprised when I so easily can name my favorite book. Without a moment’s hesitation I promptly answer the question that aggravates every booklover. But the thing is, that while different books mean different things to me, no book has ever meant as much or touched me as deep as this. I will never be done with “Persuasion”. I will read and reread it until my eyes are failing and my sight is fading. And even then, I will think about it. Quote it. Incorporate its words into my everyday routine, my mind and my life.

Because I can’t stand the thought of being without it. I will cling to its words for as long as I can. The phrase ‘favorite book’ is not just a title; it is a declaration of love.


anonsally:

that Sairus Graham’s voice saying Captain Wentworth’s words is probably the swooniest thing I’ve experienced since episode 98 of The Lizzie Bennet Diaries.




redscrunchieofpower:

FINALLY. IT IS HERE. This is the one where I ramble about Persuasion. Specifically, its dick joke, the novel form, Anne’s dude-smackdown, and war and peace. And a teeeeny tiny lil baby bit about Wentypants. Is he great? Dude, I don’t know.


"He had frequently observed, as he walked, that one handsome face would be followed by thirty, or five-and-thirty frights; and once, as he had stood in a shop on Bond Street, he had counted eighty-seven women go by, one after another, without there being a tolerable face among them."

Jane Austen, Persuasion

[Sir Walter Elliot: Number One Jerkface with all the first world problems.]


katerwauling:

The Jane Austen Collection - Penguin Hardcover Classics - Pt 8 of 8 


"I am half agony, half hope."

Many of Jane Austen’s characters struggle mightily with what Nietzsche termed amor fati — the idea that we truly love the present moment, and therefore live in it wholeheartedly. This is not unique to her writing — indeed, it applies to most every other character I’ve met as well — but it is certainly noticeable, even in the eternally practical Anne Elliot, who you meet in Persuasion. I can think of no more succinct sentence that omits the present than the one you see here. Her agony stems from a decision she made eight years earlier to let the love of her life (and with apologies to Mr. Darcy, my favorite Jane Austen male), Captain Wentworth, go. Her hope is that she can get him back. My hope for Anne is the same I had for Scarlett O’Hararelax. If she were sitting by me today, I might hand her some Kerouac, put on some Miles, and offer her some Middle Eastern wisdom on what love should be like.



"She was ashamed of herself, quite ashamed of being so nervous, so overcome by such a trifle; but so it was, and it required a long application of solitude and reflection to recover her."

- Persuasion by Jane Austen.

Man. I am Anne Elliot.



Striving to always be the half hope part of the equation by posting any and all things Persuasion.
Most posts queued.





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